3 Signs You Might Be Struggling with Binge Eating

Whether or not you suffer from an eating disorder, it is typical in our society to experience unhappiness with our body or the way we eat. Unfortunately, we exist in a society that is very appearance-focused, and that really does not allow for diversity in the way we look. This is a cultural norm, but we can work to change this by taking one small action today:

The next time you see someone you have not seen in a while, do not comment on how they look. Refrain from saying anything regarding their appearance and instead, make a comment focusing on how you feel about being with them such as, “It is so good to see you,” or, “It’s nice to get to spend some time with you.”

This simple, easy step gives the message that we are focused on seeing the person in front of us, and not evaluating their appearance.

 

Many of us are familiar with eating disorders, perhaps seeing depictions on television or in movies. Some of us are also personally challenged or have friends or loved ones who struggle with their eating. What you may not realize is that eating problems can include a range of behaviors, outside of the more commonly known Anorexia and Bulimia. One eating behavior is sometimes casually called compulsive overeating or food addiction, but when it reaches a diagnosable level, psychologists label this Binge Eating Disorder.

You may have reached this page through an internet search because you are already worried about your eating patterns, or somebody else’s eating behaviors. You may simply be wondering if your own problems with overeating would qualify as binge eating. Let’s look at three signs that you might be struggling with overeating or even binge eating:

  1. You Eat a Lot of Food in A Short Amount of Time

One of the characteristics of Binge Eating Disorder is that you eat quite a lot of food in a very short amount of time. Up to 10,000 or 20,000 calories may be consumed in just one sitting, compared to an average calorie intake of approximately 1,500 – 3,000 calories a day. Consuming this significant amount of food in one sitting is called binging. People often say that during these times they can “zone out” or lose track of what is happening around them. When binge eating, you often feel guilt and shame afterward. You may or may not engage in compensatory behaviors like self-induced vomiting, food restriction, or excessive exercise. In fact, food restriction can trigger the binge in the first place.

What can you do?

Eat regular meals throughout the day. This means that you eat roughly at the same time each day and do not go longer than about four hours without food. Research confirms that episodes of binge eating typically occur after a period of restriction (not receiving enough nourishment). While this suggested step is not sufficient to treat Binge Eating Disorder, it can be a part of eating disorder treatment and help if you struggle with occasional binge eating. Please note: The suggestions given in this article are not a substitute for treatment from a healthcare professional. Seek help if you are suffering from a serious disordered eating condition.

binge eating disorder, overeating problems California therapist

  1. You Have a Hard Time Stopping Eating

Another characteristic of binge eating is that it is hard to stop eating and there is a feeling of a loss of control. Binging is often called compulsive overeating because you may feel compelled to keep eating and as though you are not able to stop. People also call it food addiction because it can feel very much like an addiction, something you need or depend on, and are unable to reduce. Once you have started binging, it can feel impossible to stop eating despite how full you feel. Those suffering from compulsive eating often keep eating past a feeling of fullness, to a feeling of extreme physical discomfort or even in pain from the amount of food.

What can you do?

Seek help. If you find yourself unable to control your eating behaviors, you most likely could benefit from the support of a healthcare professional who specializes in binge eating. This can be a challenging behavior to change, but with the right help, change is possible. Take the guesswork out and get help from someone who knows how to help you extinguish binge eating behavior.

  1. You Have Other Mental Health Concerns

Overeating and Binge Eating are often associated with other mental health concerns. You may also be struggling with anxiety, depression, shame, guilt, self-doubt, or other troubling emotions. The relationship between these sorts of problems and binge eating can be reciprocal. In other words, one can lead the other and vice-versa. Often, we turn to food for comfort or self-soothing to cope with emotions. Finding relief in food feels helpful in the moment, but it is ultimately a maladaptive coping technique. To resolve this concern, you want to learn alternative, more effective coping skills.

What can you do?

If you are worried about your own eating behaviors, then you may consider going to therapy for Binge Eating. There are many ways a therapist can help you. Research has identified Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) as a helpful approach for Binge Eating Disorder therapy. DBT can help you learn new skills, such as mindfulness and behavioral strategies that will allow you to approach food and eating differently. These skills will also provide healthier, more effective ways of coping with your emotions. Consider contacting a DBT therapist and asking about their approach to Binge Eating Disorder treatment today.

 

 

 


4 Tips for Returning to Therapy

For an audio recording of this post, visit here: Dr. Bando on Soundcloud 

When you make the investment of time, energy and money in therapy, you want to experience progress and change. If you’ve been in therapy before but haven’t achieved the results you want, you may be wondering what you can do to make those changes. Talk therapy can feel helpful, allowing you to have some real ‘aha’ moments and gain insight into the cause of your problems. However, talk or what’s called “supportive” therapy often does not help you change and meet your goal. Often, what is needed is to learn practical, concrete skills that will help you foster lasting change and healing. This can be achieved through treatment with a results-oriented therapist.

If you’re thinking about returning to therapy and want to create more effective change, here’s what to do:

Four things to keep in mind.

1st- Know That Returning to Therapy Takes Readiness and Commitment

If you have decided on returning to therapy, that’s a great sign that usually indicates you have some readiness and commitment to do what is needed to make changes. The most important first step is finding a therapist who aligns with your goals and who you feel comfortable working with. This can help you stay committed and focused.

Many clients prefer a results-oriented therapist who will work with them to make specific changes toward goals, rather than attending therapy indefinitely. The right therapist can help you identify and build upon your goals from the start and keep you motivated to do what is needed for lasting change.

returning to therapy, return to therapy again California online

2nd- Develop A Plan

While the idea of planning your therapy might seem strange, having a goal and a plan in place makes it much more likely you will succeed in making changes. Sometimes people attend therapy to just talk or vent, but to transform your life you need to work systematically to plan and implement change.

The therapist you choose to work with should develop a case formulation within your first few sessions. This formulation offers expert reflections and additional insight on your current situation. A skilled therapist will indicate a thorough understanding of your unique situation and collaborate with you to make sure this formulation is on target. By the third or fourth session, you and your therapist should have treatment goals and a treatment plan that will guide your future sessions, help you better understand what to expect out of therapy and ensure you both keep your eyes on the prize and moving toward your goals.

 3rd- Take What You Learn in Therapy Outside the Session

One benefit of therapy can be receiving support from your therapist and leaving sessions feeling relieved or empowered. Keep in mind, this is not enough. If you are working to make changes, then you must take the work done in therapy with you, outside of the session, and into your day-to-day actions. A therapist focused on getting you the results that you want will probably ask you to do “homework” or to practice new skills throughout the week. It is essential to follow the recommendations of your therapist and do your assigned practices so that you can reap the benefits of therapy and translate them into your daily life. Practice in between sessions is imperative to change. It also arms you with information about what happened when you tried these new skills, and you and your therapist can troubleshoot and hone the skills in your next session. Your practice and feedback are invaluable in helping you and your therapist stay on track with moving toward your goals.

Depending on your therapist’s style and theoretical orientation, they may be able to implement additional ways to help you achieve change. For example, therapists that have been trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) might ask you to complete weekly Diary Cards, so you can plan to try out and practice newly learned skills and then keep track of what happened and have a straightforward way of reporting this in your next session.

4th- Discuss Problems with Your Therapist

 Therapy does not always happen on a linear path without hiccups. At times, problems may arise. Whether you felt misunderstood by your therapist, your homework did not seem to hit the mark, or you are not making the changes you expected as quickly as you wanted, it is important to talk about this honestly with your therapist. This can be an excellent time for you and your therapist to revisit your identified goals, refine your treatment plan, and figure out any adjustments that need to be made. Although it might seem like a challenging conversation, talking with your therapist about what is not working may help you discover some factors that are holding you back or halting change, making this a valuable part of your treatment. Do not underestimate the value of the feedback you give to your therapist. Once your therapist knows your experience, thoughts, and feelings, he or she has the opportunity to respond effectively, make any necessary adjustments, and this ensures you can get the quality care you want and need.

With the right approach, you can make effective and lasting changes when returning to therapy, learning new and valuable skills that lead to a more rewarding and satisfying way of life.

Remember, life is too short to just survive, that’s why I help people thrive. I’m Dr. Amanda Gale-Bando, licensed psychologist. Thank you for reading and best wishes to you in making the lasting changes you want.

 


Name that Emotion

We’ve all got things to do and people to see. Who needs unwanted emotions slowing us down? Just ignore them, and maybe they’ll go away. Right?

Here’s the hitch: emotions are hard-wired into our human experience. In other words, emotions are part of us and the more we push them away, the louder they become. When we deny and try to block out emotions, we starve them until the emotional hunger pains are so strong, we become overwhelmed with unruly, overbearing, unable-to-control feelings.  You know, that moment someone asks you something harmless like to pass the salt, and you completely lose your cool? When we suppress or don’t acknowledge emotions, they bubble up, and like water boiling in a covered pot with the burner on high, eventually they’re going to blow.

The solution? Don’t ignore the monster!

Emotions grow to become monsters when we ignore them, push through them, judge them and just plain do whatever it takes to try not to feel them. There is a better way! The next time you feel an unpleasant emotion, try noticing it and putting a name to it.

Scientists call this affect labeling. It goes something like this:

  • I am noticing a feeling of butterflies in my stomach. I’m nervous.
  • I feel a lifting, light feeling in my chest and shoulders. I’m happy.
  • I feel like it’s hard to move. I notice that I’m slumped and don’t feel like doing anything. I’m sad.
  • I can’t believe that guy just cut me off. I’m irritated.

When we give our emotion a name, it starts the process of calming it down. Instead of pushing the feelings away, we pay attention and engage our intellect to give it a name. Once emotions are acknowledged and paid attention to, they start to digest and let go of their grip. Relief can get his foot in the door, and we initiate the process of regulating emotions and feeling more in control.

 

Brain imaging studies explain the science behind affect labeling: When we experience an emotion, a part of our brain called the amygdala, gets activated. When our amygdala is very active and fired up, it is hard to access the reasoning part of our brain, the frontal lobes.

How to become Happy, Breaking through an Obstacle, Orinda Psychologist, Lafayette Psychologist, Berkeley Psychologist, Oakland Psychologist, Moraga, Alamo

 

When we use techniques like affect labeling, we begin to activate our frontal lobes (the organizing, planning, thinking-through part of the brain) and de-activate the amygdala (the “OMG!” emotional part of the brain).

 

How to become Happy, Breaking through an Obstacle, Orinda Psychologist, Lafayette Psychologist, Berkeley Psychologist, Oakland Psychologist, Moraga, Alamo

 

PRACTICE:

The next time you are “freaking out” or “stressed” or just “feeling off,” try getting specific. What emotion are you feeling? Can you put a label on it?

How to become Happy, Breaking through an Obstacle, Orinda Psychologist, Lafayette Psychologist, Berkeley Psychologist, Oakland Psychologist, Moraga, Alamo

Now, reinforce yourself by checking out the Reinforcement Practice Sheet and get some suggestions on how to reinforce yourself. You’ve just taken the first step toward processing and letting go of that unpleasant emotion.

LIFE’S TOO SHORT JUST TO SURVIVE. THAT’S WHY I HELP PEOPLE THRIVE!


Nonjudgment for Emotion Regulation

Earlier this month, I sent out a call for nonjudgment. In this time of chaos, violence, fear, and confusion, nonjudgment can be a place of refuge. Practicing nonjudgment gives us three profound gifts:

  • complete understanding
  • the power to move into compassionate, effective action
  • the ability to defuse our emotions

Let’s focus on that last gift, the ability to defuse emotions. In over a decade of working with clients, I have never once seen anyone be able to let go of and regulate an emotional response while clinging to judgments. Only when practicing nonjudgment, can regulation and emotional freedom begin.

Example:

Imagine you are quite unhappy with a manager at work. She is incompetent and makes ridiculous requests of you and the rest of her staff. You don’t know how she was ever hired for this job, let alone maintains it because most of the time, she is just plain wrong and inappropriate. It is unfair that you have to work with her.

Imagine the emotions you might feel if you were in this situation. Anger and a sense of injustice and self-righteousness, maybe? Every time you interact with this manager, you might feel like rolling your eyes, sighing and throwing up your hands in this hopeless situation.

Now try to feel better about it. Look at the situation detailed above and attempt to calm your emotions and let it go.

Not working? Impossible? Let’s try an easier way.

Look at the same example, with a line drawn through each judgment:

Imagine you are quite unhappy with a manager at work. She is incompetent and makes ridiculous requests of you and the rest of her staff. You don’t know how she was ever hired for this job, let alone maintains it because most of the time, she is just plain wrong and inappropriate. It is unfair that you have to work with her.

Without using judgment words, how would you describe this situation? Before you attempt, remember that nonjudgment is describing things as they are, without adding opinions or evaluations. It does NOT mean pretending you like or want something that you don’t. In other words,

nonjudgment = truth.

Let’s look at a nonjudgmental way of describing the same situation:

You are quite unhappy with a manager at work. You do not understand why she makes the requests she does and how they improve the function of the department or the company. After you engage with this manager, you often feel frustrated. Your peers have commented about feeling a diminished sense of morale at work due to interactions with this manager. You are disappointed by your daily interactions with her.

Notice that I don’t have to ask how you feel (as in the first example) because you’ve already described it – frustrated and disappointed. Now we’ve got something to work with!

 You might ask, “How does this help me regulate my emotions? The manager is still difficult for me to work with and I still don’t like the situation.”

This is true, AND you have gone from overwhelmed and hopeless to frustrated and disappointed. When your emotions are not bogged down by judgments and the helplessness or unrelenting anger that judgment creates, you have POWER. When we become aware that we are making judgments, we give ourselves choice – choice about whether or not it is helpful for us to proceed with our judgmental thinking, feeling, and behaving, or whether we would like to choose another path.

I teach my clients many emotion regulation strategies. Tools include step-by-step skills to come up with creative solutions to solve the problem, strategies to release the grip of the emotion and feel differently, and at times, complete and total acceptance (which often leads to emotional and environmental changes we previously didn’t know were possible). Practicing nonjudgment is a required prerequisite to these changes.

Nonjudgment does not eliminate the pain. It takes it down a notch so that you can breathe, get a bit of distance from the intensity of emotion, and regulate the emotions and/or solve the problem. If you are interested in further developing the skill of nonjudgment, try the practice suggestions below:

  • Practice noticing judgments throughout your day. When you are aware of yourself (or someone else) making a judgmental statement, or you have a judgmental thought, say to yourself “judgment.” (Over time, noticing and labeling judgments helps us become more aware of them and gives us a choice about the most effective way to proceed.)
  • Plan to sit and focus on your thoughts for 30 seconds to a minute. Imagine two different boxes, labeled “judgment thoughts” and “other thoughts.” For the next 30 seconds to a minute, notice any thoughts that come into your mind and imagine placing them in the appropriate box.
  • The next time you notice yourself being judgmental, see if you can describe (verbally or in writing) the same situation nonjudgmentally. That is, truthfully and descriptively, without judgment.

Notice the effect(s) each of these practices have on your mood, emotions, thinking. Feel free to share them on my Facebook page or in a private email. (While I may not be able to respond to all emails, I will read them and appreciate the feedback and being able to share in your experience.)

LIFE’S TOO SHORT JUST TO SURVIVE. THAT’S WHY I HELP PEOPLE THRIVE!


HOW TO FIND A RESULTS-ORIENTED THERAPIST

Maybe you have never been in therapy. Perhaps you have been in therapy, and it hasn’t gotten you the results you’d hoped.  This time, you want to try something a little bit different. You may even have a particular goal(s) and know what it is that you want to change. Now come the questions, “How do I get the results I want?” and, “Who is the best person to help me?” Despite the consumer-savvy world we live in, there is little information on how to find a therapist, let alone how to find a therapist who will truly help you achieve real results and change your life in the way that you want.

Here, you will find a five-step process to help you find a therapist who will help you achieve the goals you want to reach. Stop wasting time, money and effort with treatment that doesn’t work. Set yourself on the path to success today!

 

  1. Get COMFORTABLE. – Going to therapy can be a hard process, requiring courage to step outside of your comfort zone and ask for help. At times, therapy asks you to be quite vulnerable, talking with another person about your deepest, most private experiences. Treatment often requires you to be super uncomfortable, and even want to temporarily squirm out of your skin or run for the door. After all, you are in therapy to get help with areas that are likely challenging and possibly, quite painful. To venture to feel this awkward and uneasy, you must first be comfortable! It is so important that you are at ease in the presence of your new therapist and feel understood and not at all judged. In other words, think about whether this is a person to whom you would want to open up.
    • Ask for a PHONE CONSULTATION to get a feel for the therapist. Most therapists will agree to talk to you for a free, 10-15 minute phone consultation. During this meeting, you can give the therapist an idea of what you want help with and hear his or her response. It is important to ask questions and leave time for the therapist to talk so that you can start to assess your feel for this clinician’s competency and ability to help you. Trust your instincts. The therapist should give you a choice (or you can ask) whether you want to schedule an in-person appointment right then and there, want time to think about it, or do not believe that this therapist is a good fit for you.
    • MEET IN PERSON with the idea that you are still evaluating whether this professional is a good fit for your needs. During the first session, the therapist will likely ask you questions about why you are seeking therapy and many other detailed questions about yourself and your treatment goals. The more open you are will help you to experience how the clinician responds to you and gives you the opportunity to evaluate your comfort level with this person. Their response will provide valuable information about whether you would like to proceed or seek another’s help instead.

 

  1. Ask for a CASE FORMULATION. – A results-oriented therapist will be able to discuss their conceptualization of your problem(s) and what is currently missing for you to reach your goals. Likely, this won’t be obvious information that you already know. Rather, it should add more information to your understanding of your stuck point(s) and show you that this person has the education and experience to understand your particular problem area(s) expertly. Think of the analogy of visiting a medical doctor (M.D.). You may report your symptoms (e.g., poor digestion, feeling light-headed) and the doctor will not simply repeat your symptoms back to you: “You have poor digestion and feel light headed. That must be hard.” They will tell you, based on their evaluation (e.g., examining your vitals, blood tests), what is wrong (e.g., “You have high blood sugar.” “Your thyroid is malfunctioning.”). You can expect this same kind of expert information regarding your psychological and emotional health as well. A results-oriented mental health professional will not only repeat your complaints back to you; they will add information to fully conceptualize what is contributing to the problem and why you need help in solving it. For example, you may report repeated over-eating and sudden emotional outbursts. The results-oriented clinician may suggest after their assessment (e.g., conversation with you, standardized questionnaires), they believe these problems come from deficits in understanding how to change behaviors and regulate emotions successfully.1 The results-oriented therapist will explain this to you in detail and discuss precisely how this affects you. This explanation will be in language you understand, and the conceptualization should make sense to you. If you think the therapist is off-base, does not accurately comprehend your problem, or cannot communicate in a way that you understand and agree with, openly discuss this with him or her. If you still cannot come to an agreement, it may be time to interview another therapist for your treatment needs.

 

  1. Ask for a TREATMENT PLAN, including TREATMENT GOALS, prognosis, and length of therapy. – Just as your general medical practitioner will give you an idea of your treatment options, likely results, rate of recovery, and time needed to achieve these results, you can also expect this from a results-oriented therapist. For example, a clinician may tell you that in the first three sessions2, the two of you will collaborate to reach a case formulation. At that point (by the third session) the therapist will make a treatment recommendation. They will talk with you in detail about how the treatment he/she is recommending addresses your particular problem(s), will help you reach your goals, and the time you should expect to devote to attain this outcome, including frequency and length of sessions, and expected length of time in therapy. Alternatively, at the third session, the therapist may refer you to another professional with the expertise to help you meet your goals if you and the clinician have determined that is what is needed. Again, think of the M.D. If blood tests reveal you have a thyroid problem that is relatively simple and straightforward, the doctor may express this to you and lay out a treatment plan. If, however, the problem seems more complicated, the M.D. may then refer you to an endocrinologist or another specialist to help you achieve your health goals. Defining treatment goals in therapy is important because these goals will help you know if you are making progress and whether the therapy is working.

 

  1. Understand how you and your therapist will MONITOR TREATMENT PROGRESS and ask for HOMEWORK. – How will you know whether you are moving toward your treatment goals and making progress? This is a question a results-oriented therapist will be able to answer with clarity.
  • Together, you and your therapist may choose to use standardized measures of symptoms or progress and chart them on a graph, making sure your symptoms are decreasing, and skills needed are increasing. You may also choose to track behavioral markers, such as how often per week you are engaging in a particular behavior or have the urge to do so. Successful treatment would show a decrease in those behaviors (and possibly urges) the therapist has agreed to help you decrease (e.g., over-eating). You will also see an increase in the behaviors moving you toward your treatment goals (e.g., taking three breaths before a meal, stopping eating your meal when you experience a feeling of satiation regardless of the quantity of food left). Your therapist may ask you to chart each time you have the urge to or actually engage in these behaviors in between sessions to track your progress.
  • PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, and then, you guessed it, more PRACTICE is needed to make changes and reach your goals. Homework will always be present in results-oriented therapy. Homework doesn’t mean that you will be sent off to write a 5-page paper about what you learned. Rather, therapy homework is a way for you to put into practice what you are learning in therapy. Typically, therapy sessions last about 50 minutes once per week. What about the other six days of the week and 24 hours each day? 50 minutes is not going to change your life in the way that you want. A results oriented therapist will send you home with something to practice (e.g., filling out a worksheet about a skill you learned at your session, practice saying “no” and noticing in detail the thoughts that come into your head or sensations in your body). If you want results, you must practice. Change does not happen in our thinking. Change happens when we do things differently over and over and over again. If you want results, ask for homework!

 

  1. CONTINUE TO EVALUATE, on an on-going basis, whether your treatment is helping you move toward your goals and achieve the results you want. A results-oriented therapist will regularly review treatment progress with you using the techniques described in Step 4. Therapy is not meant to be life-long. Remember, you are hiring a professional to help you reach specifically-defined treatment goals. At some point, if therapy is working (as you are carefully monitoring), you will have achieved those goals and will either want to develop new treatment goals or decrease the frequency of your contact with this clinician or terminate your treatment.

 

Therapy can be an enriching, life-changing experience if you choose an effective treatment. Use the five steps above to help you get the help you need and deserve, and start shifting from surviving to thriving today!

 

NOTES

 

  1. This is provided as an example only and does not imply that all causes of over-eating or emotional lability come from the same source. These statements are meant to clarify the topics addressed in this article, not to assess or diagnose.

 

  1. Not all clinicians assess within one to three sessions. This is meant as an example only. Please check with the therapist you plan to see about their individual policy and of course, ensure that it makes sense and is reasonable to you.

Frequently Asked Questions:

  • What is the difference between a Ph.D., Psy.D., LMFT, LCSW, MFTi, etc., and will it affect the quality of my treatment?

A Ph.D. and Psy.D. both have doctorate degrees in psychology. LMFTs and LCSWs have a  master’s degree. A Psychological Assistant (someone with a doctorate who is not yet licensed) and MFTi (Marriage and Family Therapist intern) indicate this person is still in training and under supervision before they can become licensed. While the degree itself may show different types of training and specialties, what is usually more informative is how the therapist works with their clients. I have results-oriented colleagues with LMFT and LCSW licenses who work similarly to myself and other contemporaries who have doctorate-level training. I also have met professionals with doctorates who are not results-oriented and do more of a supportive-type therapy. In my opinion, if you follow the five steps laid out in this article, you will significantly increase the likelihood that you will work with a therapist who will help get the results you want, regardless of their type of license. Trainees can also be good options. I personally would choose to work with a Psychological Assistant or MFTi if they met all of my requirements in the 5-steps to finding a results-oriented therapist. The quality of work a therapist demonstrates to me is more important than where they are in their education and whether they have a master’s or doctorate degree. One caveat: if your problem is quite complicated and you have been to several clinicians before who haven’t helped, you may need a skilled and seasoned eye and choose a therapist who has some years of experience under his/her belt.

 

  • Should I look for a therapist with a particular theoretical orientation?

Some of my results-oriented colleagues may argue that it is imperative to receive treatment from someone doing “evidence-based therapy,” such as cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT). I like to be careful about making this generalization. There are certainly CBT practitioners who are results-oriented, and there are those who are not. Because someone professes to work under a particular modality is not an assurance that they do. More relevant is whether the therapist helps you develop treatment goals, assigns homework, monitors your progress, etc. I am less inclined to be concerned about the modality and more interested that the therapist can give you evidence that their treatment recommendation(s) works (has been researched to be effective) and the way the therapist is applying the treatment to your problem makes logical sense to you.

 

  • What if my therapist tells me that being uncomfortable with him/her or wanting to leave therapy is as a result of my problem(s) and I should not act on this?

This answer is not a straightforward “stay” or “leave.” Rather, it is a more nuanced answer: Use your WISDOM. On the one hand, if this is a new therapist, it is important to be comfortable and feel at ease in his or her presence right away. (See Step 1.) You will already be challenging yourself to grow in various ways throughout your treatment; no need to do this with the relationship with your therapist. I have talked to countless people who have stayed with a therapist they didn’t like or felt uneasy around because they assumed they (the client) were at fault and there was something wrong with them that they felt this way. I previously had a personal experience visiting a therapist with whom I was uncomfortable. I told her so, and she stated that she thought this meant I had significant problems with intimacy and needed to sit physically closer to her than I was comfortable with and work through the problems in my relationship with her. At that moment, I felt ashamed and unsure of myself. After leaving the session, and discussing it with a loved one, I determined that the only relationship in my life that I was having a significant problem with and wanted to get out of was the one with my therapist. I left, found a new therapist who I was immediately comfortable with, and therapy was successful. I have heard some version of this story from many clients about their past therapy, and often, once they remove themselves from that clinician, they find much success moving toward their goals with much more ease. On the other hand, it could be useful to ask yourself if your therapist has a point. Does this reaction toward your therapist happen in many other relationships? After visiting a few therapists, do you feel this same way about each of them? If so, you may want to consider whether this is something you want to target (work on) in therapy and may decide to stick with this therapist. You may want to consult with a trusted loved one and get some help tuning into your WISDOM to make this decision. Also, remember Step 5 and to continuously evaluate whether this treatment is helping you.


PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE

I heard that you might want to make some changes to become happier and more fulfilled.

Well, what are you waiting for?! Just do it! Do it now! Go! Start! Fast! Come on! What’s wrong with you?! Get it done!

That approach of hammering and berating yourself is not effective. In fact, it is quite unmotivating, especially in the long-term.

Did you know that it is scientifically impossible to simply change and create a whole new way of being suddenly and without practice?

Imagine you want to become a professional golfer. You decided one day that would be something you would like to do. So, you told yourself, “Just do it! It’s a matter of will. If I want it bad enough, I can have it. Just do it!” What then? Would you expect yourself, never having hit a golf ball, to go out the next day and successfully compete against Tiger Woods? Of course not. You know that is impossible.

Yet, we do this to ourselves all the time. We decide that we want to eat healthier, exercise more, act differently in our relationships, and we tell ourselves to “just do it!” Then we slip into behaving the same old way that didn’t work before and believe we have done something wrong and somehow should have gotten different results. What we are missing here is that change requires skill and

DEVELOPING A SKILL REQUIRES PRACTICE!

 Not just practice, but PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, and then some more PRACTICE.

You can start PRACTICING new behaviors to start to change your life today. Here are FIVE STEPS for successful practice:

  1. Think about what you want and make sure it is something that YOU want. (Not something you think you “should” want or a way that others believe you “should” behave.)

EXAMPLES: You want to feel healthy and vibrant in your body and want to change your eating to achieve this. (You do NOT set out to change your diet because someone told you that you should.)

  1. Now, think about some action steps that might be needed for you to be on the path toward what you want. Keep these actions steps simple and easy enough for you to do them in real time.

EXAMPLES: mindfully eat a nourishing meal, go for a walk, take a breath before responding when irritated, go to bed before midnight

  1. Write these action steps into your personal Reinforcement Practice Sheet (CLICK HERE).
  2. PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, and then PRACTICE engaging in these behaviors whenever you can.
  3. Rather than focusing on or mentally beating yourself up for when you are not practicing, focus your mind on when you do PRACTICE, and reinforce it. (Use the Reinforcement Practice Sheet for ideas.)

Most importantly, give yourself a break! Smile, laugh, understand that you are human, and revel in the imperfections along the way. (More on this in a future newsletter.)

LIFE’S TOO SHORT JUST TO SURVIVE. THAT’S WHY I HELP PEOPLE THRIVE!


© 2017 Amanda Gale Bando Phd · Designed and Developed by D-Kode Technology

Dr. Amanda Gale-Bando

Dr. Amanda Gale-Bando